Margaret Priscilla White

Female 1867 - 1951  (83 years)


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  • Name Margaret Priscilla White 
    Nickname Maggie 
    Born 19 Jun 1867  King, York, Canada West Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Female 
    Census 2 Apr 1871  King, York, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Census 4 Apr 1881  King, York, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Census 6 Apr 1891  Arran, Bruce, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Census 31 Mar 1901  Argyle, Manitoba, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Census 24 Jun 1906  Cypress River, Manitoba, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Census 1 Jun 1911  MacKenzie, Saskatchewan, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    Census 1 Jun 1921  Sasman, Humboldt, Saskatchewan, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [7
    Census 1 Jun 1926  Sasman, Saskatchewan, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [8
    Died 7 Jan 1951  Nut Mountain, Saskatchewan, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Nut Mountain, Saskatchewan, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [9
    Person ID I750  Apperly-Ball tree | Family of Eugene Francis Apperley
    Last Modified 6 Jul 2020 

    Father Robert White,   b. 14 May 1840, Upper Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Jul 1915, Nobleton, York, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 75 years) 
    Mother Mary Jane Simpson,   b. 16 Sep 1842, Nobleton, York, Canada West Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Sep 1921, Toronto, York, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 78 years) 
    Married 24 Apr 1861  King, York, Canada West Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 12 children 
    Family ID F258  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Husband William Henry Brooks,   b. 16 Jan 1863, Goldstone, Wellington, Canada West Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Jul 1936, Nut Mountain, Saskatchewan, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 73 years) 
    Married 20 Oct 1886  Bolton, Peel, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [10, 11
    Notes 
    • Brooks, William and Maggie (White)
      From the family Bible excerpts and memories of Leonard, Norman, Elmer, and Chester Brooks - written by Elmer's daughter, Ruby.
      William Henry Brooks, born 1863 at Goldstone, Ont., married Maggie Priscilla White, born 1866 at Nobleton, Ont. United in marriage at Bolton, Ont. on the 20th day of Oct. 1886. Their first home was at Tara, Ont., where four of the fifteen children were born. The first child, a girl, died at birth. The second child, Vanquilla, arrived June 16, 1888. Edward Victor, born Jan. 2, 1889, died Dec., 1890. The fourth child, William Glensmore, was born Nov. 27, 1891. With two small children, Quill and Billy, Grandad and Granny first moved west to Cypress River, Manitoba, in 1892. Here they bought land. The homestead flourished, and more land was purchased and the family grew. Nine children were born to this couple while at Cypress River: Lenard, Eva, Edith, Clifford, Myrtle, Norman, Elmer and Lynford. Clifford died accidentally when fourteen months old. The little fellow fell into the washing machine and drowned.
      The year 1900 Grandad bought a threshing machine, and did custom harvesting. It was a profitable venture. Granny had the worry of keeping the money safe as the nearest bank was many miles away. She once hid several thousand dollars in the sheaf stacks and then after several days worried that it was not safe and moved it. That same night transients took lodging in the stacks and burned them to the ground. On another occasion, Gramma was knocked unconscious and the home thouroughly ransacked. The money was not in the house. In spite of the worry and fright, is still did not stop her from helping the hungry and weary travellers trekking west. Sometimes as many as twenty-two men, women and children were taken in and given food. Their animals were also fed and watered.
      In 1906 friends and neighbours of the Brooks were moving to points further west. Dick Humphrey brought news of good land in Sask., and that same year Grandad filed for homestead rights to NE-6-36-10. In 1907 Grandad and son Billy, then 16 years old, came by train to Invermay. They bought three horses, a wagon, a walking stubble plow and whatever else was a necessity. They picked a yard site with great care. A shanty was built for shelter and a few acres plowed. Plowing was not difficult as the land was grass land in that area. They returned to Cypress for the harvest. The horses were shipped home from Invermay by train. Grandad was impressed with the land, and decided that with his large family, he needed more land and they should move.
      In 1908, Billy and Grandad returned with more horses and equipment. Later in the summer, Granny arrived with four children: Elmer and Lynford, three years old and one year old, and Edward thirteen, and Edith ten. Quill and Lenard had stayed at Cypress to manage the farm and the three remaining children: Eva, Myrtle, and Norman. Grandad had begun to build a big Ontario style house, but it was not ready to live in when Granny arrived. It was to be a very sad year for Granny and a very busy one. When harvest time came, Grandad had to return to Cypress. An epidemic of typhoid was sweeping the country and that year, and while Grandad was away several of the children got typhoid. Before Grandad got back, Edward had died Oct. 18, 1908. He was thirteen years old. Friends and neighbours were helpful and kind. One such neighbour that Dad (Elmer) remembers was Lou McNamee. Baby Lynford was nursed through his illness by Mrs. Daniard Daynard. His bed was on the grand piano. The disease raged on and Granny became a victim. She was very ill and was taken to hospital in Winnipeg. Before the fever died, several of the family were hospitalized. Lenard remembers seeing two threshing machines as he pitched sheaves and ended up in St. Boniface hospital. In those two weeks he had been very ill and remembers very little. He did remember being very hungry when he became conscious. A young nurse softened by the "Please" of Uncle Len and his roommate gave them something to eat. For two more weeks the young men were back on the critical list. By spring most of the family had become ill. My dad thinks he was the only one not to get typhoid. It was months before they were all well again. Granny and the children who had been in the hospital returned to Cypress River, and Aunt Quill had come to the homestead in Saskatchewan to look after the home.
      In the spring of 1909 Granny and son Lenard brought the rest of the family back to Saskatchewan. The house was ready to live in. In the fall of 1909, Lenard and Quill went back to Cypress River for the harvest. Aunt Quill married the boy back home, Joe Ruston, and Cypress River was their home. Aunt Quill still lives there. Uncle Joe passed away. Lenard took care of the farm and stock, and in the spring of 1910 the land at Cypress was sold and the remaining stock and equipment shipped to Kuroki. The Brooks were finally settled and the family gathered again. A new baby, Chester, had arrived in January. The mailing address was Bond. One more child was born at Bond, but it did not survive.
      The large house and big barn that now stand in the centre of N.E. of 6-36-10 became home to more than just the Brooks Family. It was a half-way house to many a traveller. The doctor, the vet, the R.C.M.P. and many others. It was open house to the weary, sick and hungry. Granny's big heart and busy hand could always accommodate one more.
      Grandad's concern for people and the future made him an interesting host. Many homes and many neighbours were to know Maggie and William Brooks. Many babies uttered their first cry in Gramm's able hands. Fevered brows felt her cold touch. In times of sickness, death and sorrow many a friend was aware of her presence, and her quiet strength and compassion.
      Garndad did get more land, and he brought one of the first threshing machines and steam engines into the area. He custom threshed from his Wadena home. He was not only a pioneer at heart but also a crusader. He had one of the first cars, and he was everywhere until it seemed to his family he was never home. Bond School, later named Glengariff, was one of his projects. He was there for the first sod turning on a rainy Sunday morning. Wadena Union Hospital came about from his efforts and more crusaders like him. Building roads took much of his time. He was school trustee, a municipal councilor, a hospital board member, and a politician. He lived a busy productive life. He died on July 13, 1936.
      Granny's activities kept her closer to her home, and she was always busy. Partial deafness from a childhood disease had accustomed her to hours of silence, and she did not mind the solitude in her later years. Her busy hand turned out mitts and socks by the dozen for her family and many grandchildren. Quilts by the dozen were also her passion. She kept busy until only a few weeks before her death on Jan. 7, 1951. She was 85. My cousins and I remember Grandma as a very special person. She could read and knit at the same time, and we used to be amazed that her eyes seemed to cover the page of her book as fast as her fingers flew at her knitting. Her life was so full and her heart so generous. It always seemed so safe at Grandma's house, she was a quiet stable person. I would like to write a book about "My Grandma Brooks".
      The old house and barn still stand in the landscape yard. I believe it is the only one of the original homes in the Nut Mountain area that still stands. I stood alone in what Granny called the parlour where the grand piano once stood and Grandad's violin hung on the wall and could hear the sound of music when a happy, busy family got together with friends for a time of music and social times. An old friend once told me that Grandad's favoutite tune was "When You and I were Young Maggie" and it was the last song he played.
      Seven of Maggie and William's children still live.
      William (Billy) served in World War I in the Navy and in the Army in World War II. He married Margaret Wicker from Webb, Sask. Billy and Margaret retired from farming and moved to Preeceville, Sask. Billy died on Feb. 24, 1967. Margaret still resides in Preeceville.
      Lenard married Lena Ruston. They lived and farmed at Cypress River until 1924, then moved to Nut Mountain and eventually to the original family farm where Len farmed until five years ago. Len and Lena live in Nut Mountain, Sask. Since brother Elmer had been farming Len's land, Len has been able to keep in close touch with the land he loves.
      Eva married Jim Cunningham. Eva is a widow and lives in an apartment at Melville. She enjoys visiting, sewing, and quilting. Myrtle married George MacKinley. They farmed for many years south of Kelvington. Myrtle, now a widow, lives at Medicine Hat, Alberta. Myrtle keeps very busy with family and friends. Her hands are always busy knitting, sewing, and she reads a lot.
      Norman and his wife live at Wynyard. They enjoy people and visiting. Their hobby is flowers.
      Elmer and his wife Francis live on the S.W. 1/4 6-36-10. The farm keeps them busy in summer. They enjoy their motor home and their family.
      Chester and Betty live at Wadena. Chester enjoys building, boating, fishing, and travelling. Betty is a nurse at Wadena Union Hospital. Chester also served in the World War II.
      Edith lived in Winnipeg for many years, then moved to B.C. where she lived at the time of her death on Feb. 13, 1968.
      Robert Lynford lost a leg with cancer, and spent many years in a wheel chair. He lived in B.C. until the time of his death in Dec. 1977. [12]
    Children 14 children 
    Last Modified 6 Jul 2020 
    Family ID F548  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 19 Jun 1867 - King, York, Canada West Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - Address:
    Lot 6, Concession IX - 2 Apr 1871 - King, York, Ontario, Canada
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    Link to Google MapsCensus - 4 Apr 1881 - King, York, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 20 Oct 1886 - Bolton, Peel, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 6 Apr 1891 - Arran, Bruce, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 31 Mar 1901 - Argyle, Manitoba, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - Address:
    36-6-13-W1 - 24 Jun 1906 - Cypress River, Manitoba, Canada
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    Link to Google MapsCensus - Address:
    NE6-36-10-W2 - 1 Jun 1911 - MacKenzie, Saskatchewan, Canada
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    Link to Google MapsCensus - Address:
    6-36-10-W2 - 1 Jun 1921 - Sasman, Humboldt, Saskatchewan, Canada
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    Link to Google MapsCensus - Address:
    6-36-10-W2 - 1 Jun 1926 - Sasman, Saskatchewan, Canada
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    Link to Google MapsDied - 7 Jan 1951 - Nut Mountain, Saskatchewan, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Nut Mountain, Saskatchewan, Canada Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Reference  "Margaret Priscilla White" The Annals of a Humble Race <July 15, 2020>, (URL: https://apperley.ca/getperson.php?personID=I750&tree=T0001).

  • Sources 
    1. [S346] Census: Canada; 1871; Ontario, York, King [Library and Archives Canada] Image.

    2. [S356] Census: Canada; 1881; Ontario, York, King [Library and Archives Canada] Image.

    3. [S1370] Census: Canada; 1891; Ontario, Bruce, Arran [Library and Archives Canada] Image.

    4. [S414] Census: Canada; 1901; Manitoba, Lisgar, Argyle [Library and Archives Canada] Image.

    5. [S615] Census: Canada; 1906; Manitoba, Cypress River [Library and Archives Canada] Image.

    6. [S686] Census: Canada; 1911; Saskatchewan, MacKenzie [Library and Archives Canada] Image.

    7. [S2541] Census: Canada; 1921; Saskatchewan, MacKenzie, Sasman [Library and Archives Canada] Image.

    8. [S5170] Census: Canada; 1926; Saskatchewan, Sasman [Library and Archives Canada] Image.

    9. [S532] Headstone: Brooks, Margaret (White).

    10. [S21] Ontario, Canada, Marriages, 1826-1938 (Ancestry.ca).

    11. [S325] International Genealogical index (The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints).

    12. [S5975] "Tears, Toil and Triumph; Story of Kelvington and District," (Kelvington Historical Society; Kelvington, Saskatchewan; 1980).


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